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Classic Science Fiction Science: Outland

The science fiction movie Outland has been described as a reimaging of the western classic High Noon set in space: The setting is Io, which is the closest large moon of Jupiter, despite the claim of the trailer that it takes place on the second. If you count all the known moons no matter how small, Io is fifth now and was fifth in 1981 when the movie came out. That’s nitpicking, especially w... Read More »

The Elves of Japan

The Elves of Japan

In Japan, even the elves are different. Fantasy novelist Satoru Sato has won a place in the postwar fantasy canon for his uniquely charming creations, the Korobokkuru. Read More »

Hollywood Loves “Remakes.” Sometimes Hardcore Fans Don’t.

The funny thing about movies is that liking or disliking them can become as political a process as anything else.  In fact, sometimes I get a pretty strong sense of whether a movie will do well not only before I have seen it, but before anyone has seen it.  I don’t mean I know whether the movie will be good or not, I can just tell that the potential audience has already made a decision. The ... Read More »

The Mirror of Our Dreams

The Mirror of Our Dreams

There is a curious phenomenon not exclusive to science fiction fandom, it is prevalent in pop music worship and other places, by which those afflicted feel a need to establish rivalries. The Star Wars fan who vociferously attacks all things Star Trek. And vice versa. The Star Trek fan determined to argue against every facet of Babylon 5. Those who can not enjoy both The X Files and Fringe. New Who... Read More »

Amazing News! 1/9/13

UPDATE: 12:00 pm 1/9/13 (Earlier news below) SPECIAL NOTICE! One of our own – Daniel M. Kimmel, will be having a book reading & signing on January 27th, 2013 at The Book Shop in Sommerville MA. for his debut novel Shh! It’s A SecretDetails here on the FB page. I’m going – anyone else within a reasonable distance might want to think about it as well (Sorry ’bout th... Read More »

Inoculate Against the Lurids: Language Is A Virus

I’m pleased to be participating at Amazing Stories by writing about pulps. But before jumping feet first into that discussion, it’s best to issue a warning: It’s always important for all participants in a conversation to make sure they understand the lingo. That’s an obvious statement when the participants are from different cultures, or if some of the terms used have very specialized meanings. Bu... Read More »

Smaug the Golden - Sunila Sen Gupta

Hobbit Art – Before the Movie (well, almost)

Kia ora and welcome to my new Visual Arts blog on Amazing Stories! First up, let's have some Hobbit art. Let me state this outright: I am not going to try to determine who is the "greatest artist" in the fandom. I am not particularly interested in who is the most technically proficient, or the most outrageously inventive. Who gets the biggest fees, the most prestigious projects, has the greatest ... Read More »

Some Superheroes Are Just Made For TV

It must be an incredibly hard decision for a studio to decide what superheros are worthy of a big screen adaptation, which should be aired on the small screen…and those that should never make it beyond the comic book page. Some have successfully made it on TV and in cinemas, Batman and Superman are the obviously choices, but there are others that you’d never consider as a big budget ac... Read More »

News: 1/8/13

News: 1/8/13

John Scalzi offers us this warning about a scam directed at SF/F/H authors scam  ALERT! Our own Ken Neth interviews Brandon Sanderson who has completed Jordan’s Wheel of Time’s final chapter- errr – book (via SFSignal) From our friends at Book View Cafe – Ursula Le Guin offers up an interesting take on awards (some of which she has refused). Not news so much as something ev... Read More »

On Genre Diversity, or ‘Why Mark Charan Newton was Right’

A couple of years ago, Mark Charan Newton, author of Nights of Villjamur and Drakenfeld, as he’s wont to do, stirred some feathers when he challenged several bloggers to diversify their book coverage, to shift focus from all the frontlist new releases and give more coverage to the wonderful backlist of the genre. Long story short, the blogosphere can only handle so many reviews of Mockingjay... Read More »

The Year’s Worst Movies – 2012

My ten best (or ten favorites) is up at North Shore Movies, where my reviews regularly appear:http://northshoremovies.wordpress.com… However I also like to unload on the worst or most overrated movies I had to suffer through over the course of the year. As I’ve often noted, some of the worst movies aren’t even screened for the press so if I didn’t review it I didn’t s... Read More »

It’s Not Christmas Without the Doctor

There’s something specific needed to make Christmas Christmassy; it’s not the turkey or the flaming pudding, no, it’s a Time Lord. Ever since the BBC reinvigorated the Doctor in 2005, Christmas has not been the same without a season adventure. For many, it’s the perfect way to end a hectic day and, for sci fi fans, the perfectly wrapped present not under the tree. Even better, this year’s episode ... Read More »

What Is Alternate History?

What is alternate history? Not as easy question to answer. Historians have been speculating on “points of divergence” since classical times. The Roman historian Livy wrote the first “counterfactual” when he speculated on what would happen if Alexander the Great turned west in 323 BC. Like a true nationalist, he believed Rome would have easily defeated him. Recently alternate history has begun to f... Read More »

Satan’s Imagination Stations

I was 8 years old, and I had gotten my greedy little hands on a copy of The Hobbit. I read it by nightlight early in the morning before my family awoke. The Lord of the Rings followed shortly after, and I even wrote my grade five book report on the plot structure of the Fellowship. One of the proudest moments of my childhood was when I completed that book report, a loving caricature of Frodo and h... Read More »

Crossroads: Where Genres Meet in the Night

Speculative fiction's ability to stay fresh is a direct result of its ability to blend with other genres: the mash-up, the hybrid, the literary crossroad are where science fiction has always found innovation. We're a magpie genre, and I think that should be celebrated and explored. Read More »

Opening Salvo

Hi. I’m glad you’re here. Come in, make yourself comfortable, and let me introduce myself. My name is Keith West. I’ve been reading science fiction and fantasy for about 35 years, coming to the genre through comics, Star Trek, and Star Wars. You’re probably wondering what I’m going to blog about. After all, there are quite a few bloggers here at Amazing Stories®. What sets me apart from the others... Read More »

Amelia by Frank Lucatuorto

We love mad scientists. We always have. It’s arguable that the Dark Ages tradition of the Evil Wizard is the earliest form of the Mad Scientist, only they didn’t have science to hang the idea on yet. We also love clocks. Always have. There’ve been clocks dating back centuries, some of those from the Middle Ages were incredibly complex, with dancing figures, cavorting animals and ... Read More »

What Was I Thinking?

I’ve never written a blog. I’ve never had the urge to write a blog. So imagine my surprise when I bumped into a fantastic opportunity that I couldn’t resist: writing a weekly blog for Amazing Stories Magazine. I could barely contain a fangirl squee! So. Much. Fun. The timing was a little awkward since I was only a week away from the launch of my first novel and was fretting over details. What samp... Read More »

The Classics: Edgar Allen Poe

I don’t intend here to eulogize Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) but to discuss some of the contributions he made to the areas of Horror, Science Fiction and Detective Fiction. Poe was born in Boston in 1809. One of the most interesting aspects of researching Poe’s background is that no one seems to know exactly what the facts of his life are and his death is even more a mystery. One account says that ... Read More »

Amazing News: January 6 2013

David Langford’s esteemed Ansible is out with it’s 2013 January issue.  Every fan ought to read it here. Voting for nominations for the Hugo Awards 2013 short list are now open.  You can learn all about the process here. Brian J. Clarke wins this year’s A. E. van Vogt Award that comes with a nice check. SFSite has the news. Mike Resnick & Arc Manor Publishing announce the imp... Read More »

Inspiration and Writing, or: OMG It’s Full of Light Bulbs!

Where does fresh-squeezed idea juice come from? Read on, and see what helps produce it. Read More »

The Artful Collector: The Art of Collecting

When asked to explain why I chose “The Artful Collector” as my byline, and what I mean by that play on words, I always respond “because there’s an “art” to collecting, whether it’s Art that you collect, or not.”  And by “artful,” I mean shrewdness is going to be needed, for success in collecting.  Since this isn’t a word one throws ... Read More »

Review: Keith Laumer’s Imperium

Imperium – Keith Laumer Baen Books 2012 – ISBN-13: 978-1451637953 – Mass Market Paperback: 640 pages. Imperium is a gathering of three Keith Laumer alternate-history novels, Worlds of the Imperium (1962), The Other Side of Time (1968), and Assignment in Nowhere (1968). Baen Books has been on the forefront of rehabilitating writers who in earlier eras did rather well in the field ... Read More »

An Interview with K. D. Emerson

Adam Gaffen for Amazing Stories Magazine: Our first Interview is with K.D. Emerson, author of – well, let’s just get right into this, shall we? What is the title of your book? K. D. Emerson: Oooh lala! I love this question because the title of my book has a double meaning. Title: Digitus 233 ASM: A double meaning? Any hints? KDE: Not tellin! Surprise, surprise! ASM: Where did the idea for th... Read More »

No. 1 – Philip Francis Nowlan, Buck Rogers, and Military SF.

I’m both stunned and excited by the comeback of Amazing Stories and that I have become a part of this historic process. And it is a historic process. I’ve been looking back at what Amazing Stories’ accomplished in the past and it just increases my anticipation. With a history of so many great writers and SF luminaries having graced its pages, the resurgence of Amazing Stories, as a literary venue,... Read More »

Brave New World of Publishing – ebook Effects On Genre Fiction

Brave New World of Publishing – ebook Effects On Genre Fiction

ebooks have enabled new opportunities for both traditional and self-published authors. Barriers to entry have been lowered, gatekeepers have expanded and both readers and writers are benefiting from this brave new world. Read More »

Review of the Martian War

Review of the Martian War

The Martian War by Kevin J. Anderson is a literary retrospective of writer H.G. Wells. It is a story based on the on the original War of the Worlds invasion premise, but this time around, several characters from other classic works by Wells partake in the adventure. Read More »

Playing the Short Game: How to Sell Your Short Fiction (Part 1)

Playing the Short Game: How to Sell Your Short Fiction (Part 1)

Introduction: Who I am and what this series will cover Hi and welcome. This is the first in a weekly series of posts I’ll be doing on how to market and sell short fiction. In this initial post, I’ll explain who this series is aimed at, why I think I can help you sell your short fiction, and finally, outline what I plan to cover in the series (and what I won’t be covering). First,... Read More »

The Unsavory Racism of Middle Earth

The concept of race in Middle Earth bears a strong resemblance to racist concepts that were popular during Tolkien's youth. Readers need to be aware of these concepts and guard against taking them literally. Read More »

The History of Fantasy, Part I: Books of Monsters

      Some people like to date Fantasy as starting with Tolkien, some like to reach back to the tales of the ancient world, but I like to split the difference and start with Beowulf. In terms of historical reach, the Anglo Saxon world is barely a stone’s throw from us today, and you can see the long reach of that language and culture in both Tolkien’s work specifically and in the tropes of modern ... Read More »

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