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Editorial

Happy 88th Anniversary Amazing Stories!
And welcome all to the first official new issue of that venerable title!
Back in the Fifties, Cold War era nuclear nightmare films were legion; Hollywood lore had us being subjected to the deprivations of a host of greatly enlarged creatures, from all manner of insects – scorpions, ants, bees, praying manti, tarantulas – straight on up through n

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TABLE OF CONTENTS April 2014.
-FICTION-

THE VOYAGE THAT LASTED 600 YEARS by DON WILCOX
SPIRIT DANCE by DOUGLAS SMITH
COSMIC CORKSCREW by MICHAEL A. BURSTEIN
HEAVENLY HORIZON by RICKY L. BROWN
LIGHTNING WAR by DUNCAN LONG
WHERE THE SPACE PIRATES ARE by JOHN M. WHALEN
WEIRD STORIES, STRANGELY TOLD by IRA NAYMAN
THE JESTER by MICHAEL J. SULLIVAN
CUSTOMER SERVICE by JOHN PURCELL
THE GENO VIRUS by R.

Amazing Stories Volume 75, Number 1, April 2014.
The Blog Team at Amazing Stories is quite the crew.  Most of them have never met each other except online, but they all share something in common: a deep and abiding love for and interest in seeing Amazing Stories come back as a market for short fiction.

Happy 88th Anniversary Amazing Stories!
And welcome all to the first official new issue of that venerable title!
Back in the Fifties, Cold War era nuclear nightmare films were legion; Hollywood lore had us being subjected to the deprivations of a host of greatly enlarged creatures, from all manner of insects – scorpions, ants, bees, praying manti, tarantulas – straight on up through n

Get acquainted with our wonderful contributors.

All the people who helped get us here!

Fiction

Thirty generations would live and die before the Flashaway reached its destination. Could the one man who was to live on keep them to their purpose?
-Original magazine blurb
THEY gave us a gala send-off, the kind that keeps your heart bobbing up at your tonsils. “It’s a long, long way to the Milky Way!” the voices sang out. The band thundered the chorus over and over.

In the beginning of things, men were as animals and animals as men.—Cree legend
Vera made a warding sign as I entered the store, my hound Gelert trailing behind me. She pretended to wipe her hands on her faded blue apron, but I caught the dance of her fingers.
“Hello, Vera. It’s been a while,” I said.
“Yes, yes it has, Mr. Blaidd,” she said too quickly, not returning my smile.

RECORDED FEMALE VOICE: “To ensure quality control, this conversation might be recorded.”
TRANSCRIPT BEGINS: “Satellite Life and Property, Customer Service, this is Monica. How can I help you?”
“Uh, yeah. Monica?”
“Yes, sir.”
“Yes. Monica. I, uh, I have been having a problem with a recent claim on my 2053 Tycho.”
“Certainly, sir.

Stasis felt unreal.
Dr. Scheihagen had warned me about that when I volunteered for this mission. “Remember, we don’t know what it’ll be like for you inside,” he said in his German accent. “We’ve never sent a human so far back before.

Commander Teresa Werek sat at the helm in the shadowy bridge, studying the subspace surveillance photos that had been relayed to her. “Zoom in on 35/150,” she ordered the computer. The photo expanded, floating in front of her. She studied it with detachment, and then slowly slide-showed the pictures in the collection, letting each horrific scene etch itself into her mind.

Vincent yanked the V-set off his head and found himself back in his apartment, lying alone and spent on his king-size bed. The cozy cabin with the fireplace had vanished. Katherine was gone.
He stared at the V-set. His vehicle to paradise. To Katherine.
The lilac scent of her lingered in his mind as he summoned her beautiful face, smiling just for him. No, he reminded himself. Not for me.

Wildcatter  dropped onto Hawking a month ahead of perihelion. We slammed in after losing a brutal tug of war with the singularity that started when we closed to 60 klicks. I was in the cockpit running a spectrometry survey through the assayer ay-eye during our final approach. I’ve flown a lot of A.U.’s with McRae; he’s a damn fine pilot. I looked up from the display when I heard him curse.

Raphaella Chang woke up with an advertisement tattooed on her face. She remembered orbiting the pop-up booth on the high street, taunting her friends, the promise of free painkillers. She dragged herself to the bathroom, and knew she wasn’t going in to work today. The advertisement was for a new model of smartphone. Her eyes were icons, her nose a scroll wheel, her mouth a start menu.

“I want you to take me to where the pirates are,” James Joyce Jameson, famous author and Holovision raconteur said, as he took a dainty sip of aperitif from a crystal goblet. “I’m told you know Esteban Romero personally.”
Frank Carson sat back in his chair and gazed across the table at the small, thin, wiry looking man sitting across from him.

Millennia have passed since the journey began. The coffer pod continues to forge ahead on an endless voyage. Cal Wellington’s timelessly preserved corpse lay dressed in the traditional white and blue tunic of a decorated officer. His burnished head rests not upon a plush pillow, but the yielding cotton of an old folded flag he defended to the end.

Hadrian discovered the most fascinating thing about plummeting in total darkness wasn’t the odd sense of euphoria from the free fall or the abject terror from anticipating sudden death but that he had the time to contemplate both.
The drop was that far.
The four had plenty of time to scream, which they’d done the moment the rope snapped. Hadrian wasn’t sure if Royce yelled.

Paul clutched his jacket and passport against his chest, blinking away rough vines that sprouted through the tiles and snaked around the metal legs of the hospital bed. He flattened himself against the wall by the door, trembling.
Flee!
He dropped his hands to his stomach, unsure if he was hearing the pixie’s thoughts or his own.

I wouldn’t call this a confession, as I feel a confession requires first the intent to do wrong and secondly the willful execution of that intent. Believe me when I say I had no premeditation of breaking the law or causing any type of catastrophe when I set out. It just turned out that way. Consider this merely an explanation of the events leading up to my arrest.
I am Dr. Albert Van de Graaf.

Non-Fiction

Cover Notes by Frank Wu
Steve Davidson asked me to do the cover for the re-launch of Amazing Stories.  Whoopee!
AMZ was the first magazine dedicated to science fiction, and my hero Frank R. Paul did all the covers for the first few years.  This meant that the first SF images ever seen by the likes of Ray Bradbury and Arthur C. Clarke and Forry Ackerman were FRP covers.

(The Voyage That Lasted 600 Years was Originally published in Amazing Stories Oct 1940)
INTRODUCTION
Old-timers and historians of science fiction typically identify Robert A. Heinlein’s “Universe” as the first generation starship story and A. E.

A review of Andy Weir’s The Martian.

Steve Davidson for Amazing Stories: Welcome to Amazing Stories Andy.
In interviews elsewhere, you mention that you’re a science fiction fan. When did you start reading science fiction?
Andy Weir: I started back when I was a kid. I don’t remember any time in my life when I wasn’t a fan.

Exploration has become an integral part of modern American culture. From the journeys of early travelers across the continent to the first men to walk on the moon, the glory of discovery has become mythologized within our society. This accounted in part for the sense of loss that many people felt when NASA and other government agencies announced cutbacks to our space program.